Get Ahead with an Online Bachelor’s in Criminal Justice


Criminal Justice (Bachelor of Arts)

Prepare yourself to secure our nation, our nation’s resources or your local community – earn your online Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice from Grantham University. This 100% online degree program gives you the knowledge you need to excel in the criminal justice workforce. Pursue your degree in a generalized program or specialize in one of two in-demand areas of concentration: Homeland Security or Computer Science.

What will I learn from the online bachelor’s in Criminal Justice program?

After completing this online degree in criminal justice program, you will be able to pursue – or advance in – a career in law enforcement, corrections, investigations, cyber security, homeland defense or juvenile justice1.

Homeland Security Concentration – Border security and intelligence, terrorism prevention and analysis, emergency and disaster planning – prepare for work protecting our nation from all kinds of natural and man-made threats.

Computer Science Concentration– Prepare for a cybersecurity career by studying computer crime, computer forensics, ethical hacking, computer crime scene investigation and criminal intelligence analysis.

What careers can I pursue with this online bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice?

Depending on your concentration, or if you choose to pursue a generalized degree program, you could pursue a career in corporate loss prevention, national security, computer security or, depending on your experience, become a Shift Supervisor, Sergeant or higher as a member of a police force1.

How long is this Criminal Justice online degree program?

At 121 credit hours, your accredited online criminal justice degree program is designed to be completed in 38 months. It could take less time depending on how much transfer credit you receive and how many classes you take every term.

How much will the online bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice program cost?

The undergraduate rate is $265 per credit hour … lower if you’re a member of the military, a veteran or part of a military family. Grantham also offers scholarships and financial aid for those who qualify – including our first responders.

When can I start?

Courses begin weekly, so we’re ready when you are.

Call us at (888) 947-2684 to learn more about our accredited degree programs, financial assistance opportunities or enrollment process.

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Criminal Justice (Bachelor of Arts)

Criminal Justice Outcomes

After successfully completing your criminal justice degree classes, you will be able to:

  • Explain the various causes of crime using criminal justice theories, practices and processes to a multicultural population
  • Compare and contrast historical and contemporary police functions, issues and responses to crime
  • Describe the nature and function of corrections, its services, practices and institutions
  • Analyze relevant criminal law and procedures as they relate to the administration of justice
  • Differentiate between adult and juvenile procedures throughout the criminal justice system
  • Apply the concepts of professionalism, ethical behavior and social responsibility to make decisions as a criminal justice professional
  • Evaluate the three components of the criminal justice system

University Professional Outcomes

Grantham University prepares graduates to succeed in a variety of professional and civic settings by incorporating these five critical life skills into the curriculum:

  • Communication – competence in effective written and oral communication
  • Critical Thinking – ability to analyze problems, reflectively process information and formulate solutions
  • Respect for Diversity – awareness of and appreciation for varieties of human experiences and social structures
  • Professional, Ethical and Social Responsibilities – responsibility to the greater societal good and an applied ethical framework in decision making
  • Lifelong Learning – definition for and acquisition of a continuing pursuit of educational needs throughout their professional lives

NOTE: Students seeking a career in law enforcement at the local or state level will require additional training and testing. This additional training is determined by the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) in each student’s state.

Criminal Justice (Bachelor of Arts)

Pursue a criminal justice degree online and pursue a career in detection, apprehension, detention and other police-related career opportunities1.

Potential career paths and positions include:

  • Corporate Security Manager
  • Director Security Management
  • Security Director
  • Regional Loss Prevention Manager
  • Senior Manager Asset Protection
  • Market Asset Protection Manager
  • Loss Prevention Manager
  • Front-Line Supervisor (Police and Detectives)

Employers can include:

  • Security firms
  • Insurance companies
  • Local, state and federal law enforcement agencies

Criminal Justice (Bachelor of Arts)

Grantham University’s 100% online coursework is designed to help you prepare for success in your next career.

PROGRAM SNAPSHOT:
Program Core Credits: 40
General Education Core Credit: 18
Electives Credits: 63
Total Credit Hours: 121
Accreditation(s): DEAC

Textbook Information

Program Core: 40
Course: Title: Credits:
Course: GU100 Title: Student Success Credits: 1
  This required one-credit hour course introduces Grantham students to various strategies for learning and helps develop skills essential for succeeding in an online education program. Students complete selfassessments to become familiar with their learning styles and how to use their learning styles in online studies. Students successfully completing this course are more proficient in time management, reading skills, writing techniques, memory abilities, and test-taking strategies. Students learn how to navigate within Grantham University's online course learning environment, submit assignments, and where to go for academic assistance. GU100 is normally taken with level 100 or 200 courses that offer the most common challenges in working in an online learning environment. Students complete assignments in both courses simultaneously as a learning strategy for general education and entry-level knowledge acquisition while developing successful online study skills. Successful completion of G
Course: CJ101 Title: Introduction to Criminal Justice Credits: 3
  Introduction to Criminal Justice presents a broad view of the criminal justice system. The course focuses on decision points and administrative practices in police and other criminal justice agencies, as well as basic criminal procedures. A realistic description of the American criminal justice system is presented and how it works - police, courts, and corrections. Topics include: what is criminal justice, the crime picture and the search for its causes, criminal law, policing history and structure, police management and legal aspects, adjudication including the courts and sentencing, corrections involving probation, parole, community corrections, prisons and jails, prison life, juvenile justice, drugs and crime, multinational criminal justice, and the future of criminal justice.
Course: CJ102 Title: Introduction to Criminology Credits: 3
  The student is introduced to the study of criminology by examining the biological, psychological, sociological, and economic theories of crime. The traditional theories of criminology are examined along with contemporary theories. The student in this course will be allowed to draw his or her own conclusions about the American crime problem and make informed decisions about public policy in the crime control area. Topics covered are: what is criminology; patterns of crime; research methods and theory development; biological, psychological, and sociological roots of crime; crimes against persons and property; white-collar and organized crime; drug abuse and crime; technology and crime; criminology and social policy; and the future of criminology.
Course: CJ201 Title: Police Systems & Practices Credits: 3
  The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of police issues, integrating the history, social context, and theoretical understanding of policing in America. This course encourages the student to see the relationships between communities, police organizations, and individuals. The big picture approach is used to illustrate an integrated understanding of policing.
Course: CJ202 Title: Correction Systems & Practices Credits: 3
  Contemporary correctional systems and practices are analyzed and evaluated through a historical perspective with emphasis on community and institutional corrections. This course balances current and past research, theories and applications, and practical examples and issues. Topics included are: historical perspectives, the court process, alternatives to imprisonment, correctional systems, corrections functions, institutional clients, rights of correctional clients, reintegration systems, and finally a link to the future.
Course: CJ203 Title: Juvenile Justice I Credits: 3
  The juvenile justice system is examined with an emphasis on its difference from the judicial system for adults. This course tracks the historical development of the system and examines the different approaches followed by the court and correctional authorities of various jurisdictions.
Course: CJ302 Title: Criminal Procedure Credits: 3
  This course presents and explains the core knowledge that is constitutional criminal procedure. The topics have been selected to reflect those that are of greatest interest to criminal justice students. Topics include essential Fourth Amendment doctrines such as: the exclusionary rule, the search warrant, plain view, arrest and Terry-stops, and warrant less searches. This focus also reflects the areas in which the Supreme Court has been most active in recent years. The conflicting approaches to the application of law evident between justices adhering to the Due Process Model and those following the Crime Control Model will be addressed. Additional topics in the course include the meaning, context, and constitutional foundation of criminal procedure; the right to counsel; rules of interrogation and confession; identification of suspects and entrapment; and the pretrial and trial process.
Course: CJ305 Title: Introduction to Criminal Justice Ethics Credits: 3
  This course identifies and examines the diverse ethical issues frequently encountered in the criminal justice system. Students will become familiar with the major theorists who have studied and written in the field of ethics. The writings of Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle will be examined, for their intrinsic value and content, as well as their applicability to modern activities in criminal justice. Classic ethical theories will be studied, reviewed, and applied to such varied topics as the application of professional and personal discretion, the appropriate use of force, dimensions of professional responsibility, and proper application of authority.
Course: CJ309 Title: Criminal Law Credits: 3
  Criminal Law examines the basic concepts in criminal law. The course introduces the student to the foundational aspects of criminal law, including its historical background and fundamental elements. The author provides a comparative analysis of a multiplicity of jurisdictions throughout the U.S. and the impact of criminal law on each. The author accomplishes this task by focusing on the major themes of both common law and, according to the Model Penal Code, including the elements of statutory crimes, criminal responsibility, and defenses. Topics include: the historical background of criminal law, fundamentals of criminal law, jurisdiction, the criminal act, the mental element, matters affecting criminal responsibility, assault and related crimes, homicide, sex offenses and offenses to the family relationship, theft, robbery, burglary and related offenses, arson, kidnapping, narcotics, and offenses by and against juveniles.
Course: CJ401 Title: Community Policing Credits: 3
  This course is designed to provide an overview of the current paradigm in policing: community-oriented policing. The course will consist of an analysis of both the community-oriented policing philosophy and its practical application through strategic oriented policing, neighborhood oriented policing and problem oriented policing methods. Additional aspects to be reviewed include the various roles in the systemic approach, organization and management styles of the police department, implementation methods, evaluation methods, and a look at past and future practices under this new paradigm in policing.
Course: EN361 Title: Technical Writing Credits: 3
  This course teaches the skills needed to produce such forms as memos, informal reports, proposals, and letters of applications. The course starts with theory and proceeds to skills and applications. Some of the topics studied include the Technical Writing Process, Research, Summarizing, Outlining, and Formatting of various reports. Your knowledge of the subject matter will be evaluated through objective tests, and your writing skills will be evaluated by your performance on writing assignments.
Course: PA301 Title: Introduction to Public Administration Credits: 3
  Public administration is a broad-ranging and amorphous combination of theory and practice; its purpose is to promote a superior understanding of government and its relationship with the society it governs, as well as to encourage public policies more responsive to social needs and to institute managerial practices attuned to effectiveness, efficiency, and human requirements of the citizenry.
Course: CA408 Title: Research Methods Credits: 3
  Research Methods presents a broad view of the methods and techniques for conducting academic and professional research. The course focuses on why and when research is performed, the methodologies involved, and a description of the applied statistical tests most often used. Techniques and procedures are compared and contrasted so each student gains a firm understanding of what method or test to use and why. Topics include: the research enterprise, theory and research, ethics in research, research design, sampling techniques, questionnaires, interviews, observational techniques, secondary data, reliability and validity issues, data coding, hypothesis testing, and sampling distributions.
Course: CA499 Title: Professional Strategies Credits: 3
  Professional Strategies is designed as a senior-level capstone course to be taken at the end of the Multidisciplinary Studies program. This capstone course provides an opportunity for students to synthesize and articulate their undergraduate experience by demonstrating knowledge and skills acquired in previous coursework and/or work experience. Professional Studies reviews the fundamentals of research and the utilization of these skills in a professional environment. The course will require two research papers whose topics must be approved by the course instructor.
General Education: 18
Course: Title: Credits:
Course: CO101 Title: Introduction to Public Speaking Credits: 3
  This course focuses on the basic principles of effective verbal communication and the related functions in contemporary public settings. Emphasis is placed on speech to inform and to persuade, with special consideration given to fundamental communication skills, including organization, reasoning, explanation, and listening. Students will learn to prepare a speech without the need to memorize the presentation. This course is designed to help students understand the difference between ideas and memorizing words. The progression of learning should help students learn to understand, value, and practice the human communication process.
Course: CS105 Title: Introduction to Computer Applications Credits: 3
  Students are introduced to basic computer concepts as well as techniques and tools for folder and file navigation and manipulation. Students explore the fundamentals of an office productivity suite, developing skills in word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.
Course: EN101 Title: English Composition I Credits: 3
  This course develops written communication skills with emphasis on understanding the writing process, analyzing readings and practicing writing for personal and professional applications.
Course: EN102 Title: English Composition II Credits: 3
  This is a freshman college-level writing course designed to build on skills learned in EN101. The student is expected to complete writing assignments that spring from assigned reading material, which clearly evince an awareness of social issues. Upon successful completion of EN102, students should be competent in reading, reflecting on, and responding to literature using scholarly analysis, organizing clear and effective writing with a thesis statement, anticipating bias by viewing all sides of an issue, performing effective research using library resources, monitoring tone and using appropriate argumentative skills when pursuing a thesis, using MLA formatting guidelines for research papers, and avoiding plagiarism with careful documentation.
Course: GU299 Title: General Education Capstone Credits: 3
  GU299 is the capstone course for Grantham University's general education program, and it serves a dual purpose. First, GU299 helps students bridge the gap between the broad-based learning they experience throughout their general education courses and the discipline-specific learning they will engage in as they move closer toward degree completion. By highlighting the specific skills and knowledge they attained through their general studies and working with them to incorporate those skills and that knowledge within their specific academic areas, students will achieve a greater awareness of how knowledge is intertwined, and better recognize how information drawn from one experience can be applied directly toward another, leading them to become more actively engaged, socially-aware citizens of the various communities to which they belong.
Course: HU260 Title: Strategies for Decision Making Credits: 3
  This course is about becoming a better thinker in every aspect of your life: in your career, and as a consumer, citizen, friend, parent, and lover. Discover the core skills of effective thinking; then analyze your own thought processes, identify weaknesses, and overcome them. Learn how to translate more effective thinking into better decisions, less frustration, more wealth - and above all, greater confidence to pursue and achieve your most important goals in life.