Bachelor of Business Administration (Concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management)

Give your career a boost with a degree that prepares you to manage and coordinate logistical functions in any business: acquisitions, receiving, handling, resource allocation and more! Your online Bachelor of Business Administration with a Concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management provides a broad-based education to be successful in the field.

What will I learn in the online bachelor’s degree program with a concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management?

You’ll learn the ins and outs of logistical and supply chain management functions within an enterprise – from planning and directing purchasing areas to distribution and warehousing. Coursework integrates instruction in purchasing, inventory control, storage and handling, logistics planning, quality control and more.

What careers can I pursue with a bachelor’s degree with a concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management?

This online business administration degree can help you pursue a number of supply chain management positions – from logistics or supply chain management to industrial production management1. You can also pursue a career in logistics analysis.

How long is this online bachelor’s degree with a concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management program?

At 122 credit hours, your degree program is designed to be completed in 38 months. It could take less time depending on how much transfer credit you receive and how many classes you take every term.

How much will the bachelor of business administration degree program cost?

The undergraduate rate is $265 per credit hour – lower if you’re a member of the military, a veteran or part of a military family. Scholarships are also available for those who qualify.

When can I start?

Courses begin monthly, so we’re ready when you are.

Call us at (888) 947-2684 to learn more about our accredited degree programs, financial assistance opportunities or enrollment process.

Bachelor of Business Administration (Concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management)

Program Outcomes

After successfully completing your BBA with a concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management, you will be able to:<

  • Demonstrate critical thinking through applying decision support tools
  • Demonstrate communication skills
  • Apply decision making skills that are relevant to professional, ethical and social responsibilities
  • Utilize strategic, tactical and operational methods in the decision making process to gain a competitive business advantage
  • Analyze economic, environmental, political, ethical, legal and regulatory guidelines
  • Engage in integrated business problem-solving activities by distinguishing the theories, principles and concepts related to the foundational areas of business in a global environment
  • Develop managerial strategies in transportation
  • Design logistical operations that reduce conflict channels using market distribution strategy development, implementation and management
  • Analyze the roles of stakeholders in transportation logistics

University Professional Outcomes

Grantham University prepares graduates to succeed in a variety of professional and civic settings by incorporating these five critical life skills into the curriculum:

  • Communication – competence in effective written and oral communication
  • Critical Thinking – ability to analyze problems, reflectively process information and formulate solutions
  • Respect for Diversity – awareness of and appreciation for varieties of human experiences and social structures
  • Professional, Ethical and Social Responsibilities – responsibility to the greater societal good and an applied ethical framework in decision making
  • Lifelong Learning – definition for and acquisition of a continuing pursuit of educational needs throughout their professional lives

Bachelor of Business Administration (Concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management)

Grantham University’s 100% online and professionally relevant coursework is designed to help you prepare for your next career.

PROGRAM SNAPSHOT:
Program Core Credits: 55
General Education Core Credits: 30
Electives Credits: 21
Total Credit Hours: 106
Accreditation(s): DEAC
Program Core: 55
Course: Title: Credits:
Course: GU101 Title: Student Success Credits: 3
  This course provides students with the foundation of knowledge and skills needed for today's online college environment. Students will explore their own preparedness for online learning through examination and analysis of their own skills, traits, and behaviors. In addition, students will acclimate to the online college environment through specifically-designed activities which provide opportunities to acquire necessary skills, behaviors, and understandings which are essential for academic success.
Course: ACC220 Title: Financial Accounting Credits: 3
  This introductory financial accounting course introduces the student to the important role of financial accounting in modern business. The key role of financial accounting is to provide useful information to external users so that a wide variety of economic decisions can be made. The course covers the theory and practice of accounting applicable to the recording, summarizing and reporting of business transactions. Topics include the different types of financial statements and accounts, asset valuation, revenue and expense recognition and appropriate accounting for asset, liability and capital accounts.
Course: ACC226 Title: Managerial Accounting Credits: 3
  This course is a continuation of Financial Accounting, shifting the focus from external reporting to internal needs of managers. Managerial accounting information helps managers accomplish three essential functions: planning, controlling, and decision-making. The course provides students with an understanding of managerial accounting information to enable them to evaluate the usefulness of managerial accounting techniques in the real world. Topics include managerial accounting terminology, budgeting, costing, breakeven analysis, and cost-volume-profitability analysis. The methods of identifying and extracting relevant information from managerial accounting systems as an input to decision making and performance evaluation are stressed throughout the course.
Course: BUS101 Title: Introduction to Business Credits: 3
  This introductory course provides students with a practical and concrete explanation of the concepts of business. Concepts, principles, and operations of the private enterprise system are identified in this course. Students compare and contrast sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, and they learn the advantages and disadvantages of each. This course also discusses the functions of modern business management, marketing, and ethics and social responsibility. Human resource management is described as well as how employers can motivate their employees. Bookkeeping, accounting, financial management, and financial statements are also examined.
Course: BUS499 Title: Business Policy and Strategy Credits: 3
  Business Policy and Strategy is the capstone course for business administration majors. This advanced course is designed to provide students with a general management perspective of the total business enterprise. Students learn new strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation concepts and techniques. Students use this new knowledge, coupled with knowledge acquired from other courses, to chart the future direction of different types of organizations. The course builds on previous courses in diverse functional areas to offer insights and analytical tools, which a general manager needs to plan and implement successful business policies and strategies. The course emphasizes the practical application of business theory to business problems.
Course: CS165 Title: Advanced Microcomputer Applications Credits: 4
  This course provides the student with coverage of advanced topics related to microcomputer applications. It extends the student's basic knowledge of the Microsoft Office software suite with various readings, hands on activities, and a final integration project. Topics studied include word processing (Word), spreadsheets (Excel), database (Access), and graphic presentations (PowerPoint).
Course: ECN201 Title: Microeconomics Credits: 3
  This course provides the undergraduate student with an introduction to microeconomics. It provides the student with a sound foundation in economic thinking that is central to business. Topics that are covered include supply and demand, opportunity costs, elasticities, utility theory, the economic concept of the firm, the relationship between costs and capital in the short-run and in the long-run, competition, monopoly, anti-trust laws, and public and private goods.
Course: ECN206 Title: Macroeconomics Credits: 3
  This introductory course provides an overview of current and traditional concerns and methods of macroeconomics. Topics that are covered include economic growth, unemployment inflation, government deficits, monetary policy, investment and capital, the role and methods of the Federal Reserve, Keynesian and monetarist theories, and comparative advantage.
Course: ETH301 Title: Business and Society Credits: 3
  This intermediate course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of business and how it relates to society as a whole. The major topics include the corporation in society, the business and the social environment, business and the ethical environment, business and government in a global society, the corporation and the natural environment, business and technological change. A systems-thinking approach is central to the course, wherein business, government, and society are so closely intertwined that an action that affects one will inevitably affect the others. The corporation's responsibilities to primary and secondary stakeholders, both economic and ethical, are studied in light of various social issues.
Course: FIN307 Title: Principles of Finance I Credits: 3
  This intermediate course examines the role of the financial manager in the overall management and control of a firm. Focus is placed on the use of analytical models for improving the decision-making process. Both the short-term management of working capital and the long-term planning of capital structure and investment strategy are covered. Topics include financial ratio analysis, the time value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, free cash flows, capital budgeting and the cost of capital.
Course: HRM340 Title: Human Resource Management Credits: 3
  This course provides students with a comprehensive review of the concepts and techniques associated with strategic human resource management (HRM) in an emerging global context. Key issues examined are the legal, ethical, and regulatory nature of the business environment. Also studied are the specific technical areas of job evaluation, recruitment and selection, compensation and benefits, training and development, performance appraisal and employee relations. Of importance is the examination of such areas as technology, international staffing, and global competition.
Course: IS242 Title: Management Information Systems Credits: 3
  Students apply the fundamental concepts of Information Systems to business. Topics include coverage of information technology in management, information systems in decision-making, planning of information systems, systems developments, controls and security measures, and electronic commerce coverage.
Course: LAW220 Title: Business Law I Credits: 3
  This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the law that affects business operations including the topics of torts, contracts, commercial paper, and sales. New developments that affect the legal environment of business are presented from all three sources of law: statutes, regulations, and case law. The student will gain a thorough understanding of law that governs business and will gain an understanding of how new developments in technology affect business law.
Course: MA215 Title: Business Statistics Credits: 3
  In this course students learn to apply descriptive and inferential statistics to solve business problems. Students perform statistical analysis of samples, compute the measures of location and dispersion, and perform linear and multiple regression and correlation analysis. Other topics include constructing a hypothesis, performing one-way and two-way analysis of variance, and making decisions under risk and uncertainty.
Course: MGT150 Title: Principles of Business Management Credits: 3
  This introductory course provides students with a practical and concrete explanation of the concepts and techniques they will need as managers in today's new organizations. The sequence of topics follows the familiar pattern of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Throughout the course, the manager's role in leading and accommodating change is emphasized. The course also introduces the student to the issues of managing global businesses, especially the ways in which managers need to develop a global perspective in order to be successful. Issues in strategy, diversity, and entrepreneurship are covered extensively.
Course: MGT468 Title: Organizational Behavior Credits: 3
  This course introduces students to concepts and principles of organizational behavior. Students investigate the impact that individuals, groups, and structures have on behavior within organizations, for the purpose of applying such knowledge toward improving an organization's effectiveness. Topics addressed include motivation, leadership, communications, group structure and process, attitude and values, and the change process.
Course: MKG131 Title: Foundations of Marketing Credits: 3
  This course on the principles of marketing provides an introduction to the nature and fundamentals of the marketing activity in modern businesses. The broad view of marketing that is presented builds on the integration of marketing with the entire enterprise, reinforced by theories and concepts as well as practices and applications. Topics include an analysis of the economic factors influencing buyer behavior, marketing research, market segmentation, development of marketing programs (new product, price, advertising and distribution decisions), and international marketing. The course also covers new marketing technologies that are revolutionizing the way companies bring value to their customers.
Course: RCH480 Title: Advanced Business Research Credits: 3
  The course introduces the student to the techniques and principles of the applied research process most frequently used by the business scholars within the industry. Students will learn different research methods, identify and investigate a business problem, use the findings to create solutions to the problem and present their own conclusions based on the findings. Topics of interest include definition of the research problem, formulation of research question and hypotheses, sampling, data collection, data analysis, research design, and interpretation of the data. Furthermore, students are expected to critique and analyze business literature pertinent to their topic.
General Education: 30
Course: Title: Credits:
Course: CO101 Title: Introduction to Public Speaking Credits: 3
  This course provides students with a broad overview of public speaking, including such topics as audience analysis, idea generation and development, speech organization and speech delivery. Topics include how to outline speeches, create effective introductions and conclusions, use appropriate language and control nervousness. In addition, students examine guidelines for and practice delivering informative and persuasive speeches. Students will record themselves delivering speeches, thus they will need to know how to use a webcam and how to upload video files from their devices into the assignment dropbox in the Learning Management System.
Course: CO210 Title: Business Communication Credits: 3
  Students develop professional communication skills for use in today's fast moving professional environment. With a focus on oral and written communication for business, students discover how to design and deliver messages in both formal and informal venues. Students are expected to integrate knowledge about perception, conflicts, leadership skills, and nonverbal communication as they develop advanced communication skills.
Course: CS105 Title: Introduction to Computer Applications Credits: 3
  Students are introduced to basic computer concepts as well as techniques and tools for folder and file navigation and manipulation. Students explore the fundamentals of an office productivity suite, developing skills in word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications.
Course: EN101 Title: English Composition I Credits: 3
  This course develops written communication skills with emphasis on understanding the writing process, analyzing readings and practicing writing for personal and professional applications.
Course: EN102 Title: English Composition II Credits: 3
  This is a freshman college-level writing course designed to build on skills learned in EN101. The student is expected to complete writing assignments that spring from assigned reading material, which clearly evince an awareness of social issues. Upon successful completion of EN102, students should be competent in reading, reflecting on, and responding to literature using scholarly analysis, organizing clear and effective writing with a thesis statement, anticipating bias by viewing all sides of an issue, performing effective research using library resources, monitoring tone and using appropriate argumentative skills when pursuing a thesis, using MLA formatting guidelines for research papers, and avoiding plagiarism with careful documentation.
Course: FIN210 Title: Personal Finance Credits: 3
  This introductory course provides the student with a basic understanding of personal financial planning. The course is designed to help students understand how to plan for a successful financial future for themselves and their families. The course offers a comprehensive treatment of financial planning to help students understand the complexities of today's financial world and evaluate their financial options through a formal decision-making approach.
Course: GP210 Title: American Government I Credits: 3
  This undergraduate course provides an introduction to American government and politics. Topics include the concept of a constitutional democracy, federalism, first amendment rights, equal rights under the law, political culture, political ideology, interest groups, lobbying, and political campaigns and elections.
Course: HU260 Title: Strategies for Decision Making Credits: 3
  This course is about becoming a better thinker in every aspect of your life: in your career, and as a consumer, citizen, friend, parent, and lover. Discover the core skills of effective thinking; then analyze your own thought processes, identify weaknesses, and overcome them. Learn how to translate more effective thinking into better decisions, less frustration, more wealth - and above all, greater confidence to pursue and achieve your most important goals in life.
Course: MA105 Title: College Algebra Credits: 3
  An introductory level course on the fundamental concepts of algebra. Topics include equations, polynomial and rational functions and graphing, and exponential and logarithmic functions.
Course: GU299 Title: General Education Capstone Credits: 3
  GU299 is the capstone course for Grantham University's general education program, and it serves a dual purpose. First, GU299 helps students bridge the gap between the broad-based learning they experience throughout their general education courses and the discipline-specific learning they will engage in as they move closer toward degree completion. By highlighting the specific skills and knowledge they attained through their general studies and working with them to incorporate those skills and that knowledge within their specific academic areas, students will achieve a greater awareness of how knowledge is intertwined, and better recognize how information drawn from one experience can be applied directly toward another, leading them to become more actively engaged, socially-aware citizens of the various communities to which they belong.

NOTE: Electives credits include nine (9) General Education elective credits.